Half Lotus

Half Lotus

Everyday I sit
in this huge leather
chair, legs crossed
in yoga style called
a ‘half-lotus’ pose.

Started as a child
when short stature
didn’t allow feet
to rest firmly
on the floor.

Causing discomfort
when I’d rise
and a stumbling
gait from lack
of circulation.

Severe spinal stenosis
continues to cause pain,
as spine slowly collapses
in tiny increments
that steal height.

Doctor says, at my age,
the way I sit might be
the only reason
I remain mobile,
albeit, with a cane.

And I must wonder,
if the way I sit
is the reason I see
the world so differently
than many others.

Through a lens
of metaphor and simile,
meditative imagery,
that still awes me,
like that child

of shortened stature.

Elizabeth Crawford  6/21/2017

Notes: Image is from the internet.

Posted for Poets United: Mid-Week Motif – Yoga
http://poetryblogroll.blogspot.com/

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About 1sojournal

Loves words and language. Dances on paper to her own inner music. Loves to share and keeps several blogs to facilitate that. They can be found here: http://1sojournal.wordpress.com/ https://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/ http://claudetteellinger.wordpress.com/
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16 Responses to Half Lotus

  1. thotpurge says:

    Wow.. you’ve written about pain with a calmness that is almost impossible. And yes you do see the world with a grace and optimism that is inspiring.

    Thank you, Rajani. Most days the pain is simply background noise to be ignored. However, on occasion I simply curl up and nap a lot. Perhaps it has to do with being a Hermit and owning a rich memory, fueled by that meditative posture, and knowing the day would come when I wouldn’t be able to do what I used to do?

    Elizabeth

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  2. oldegg says:

    The world is still beautiful even though I too have three legs!

    Like

  3. Sumana Roy says:

    Oh that stumbling gait I know. Yet in spite of all this what wonderful world is born through that ‘lens’ you’ve been gifted with! Very inspiring indeed…..

    Sumana, the stumbling was a lack of circulation from sitting with my legs dangling down with only my toes on the floor. If I moved too quickly, I’d end up on my butt, or worse. Eventually, I did learn to move slowly, but got so comfortable in the lotus pose that I’ve been known to sit that way in restaurants and public waiting areas. And I have often wondered if that meditative pose did fuel my inner vision. Just never wrote about it before this particular prompt. Thank you for the comments,

    Elizabeth

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  4. magicalmysticalteacher says:

    Whatever it is that makes you see the world differently than most people, I’m glad it does, for you continue to gift us with wondrous poems from your “seeing.”

    Thanks so much, MMT. You have certainly lifted my spirit today, but then you too, have a wonderful gift of seeing,

    Elizabeth

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  5. Sherry Marr9 says:

    It is amazing you can do it. If i even tried, it would mean a call to 9-1-1 lol. I love that lens of metaphor and imagery.

    Oh Sherry, once when I was waiting for an appointment at the Aging and Disability Center, an older woman, walking passed, stopped and asked me how I did that (pointing at my crossed legs). Told her I’d been doing it most of my life. She turned and went off to drag her Yoga Instructor back, exclaiming at how flat down my legs were, and she’d been trying for years, but couldn’t do it. The Instructor just grinned and we got into a conversation about how she did the same thing in public places because it was just more comfortable. Until that moment, I didn’t know it was a classic Yoga pose, and began to wonder about my very active meditation experiences, lol. And we both know where that has taken me,

    Elizabeth

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  6. frankhubeny says:

    I think the way one sits is very important. I can’t get into the lotus position, but I try to keep the back straight when walking or sitting. Will Johnson wrote a book called The Posture of Meditation which mentions having the legs lower than the hips helps one to sit better. I have heard concert musicians use something similar to help with breathing.

    Thanks Frank, and I know, now, it can and does quicken a meditative state, something I do very easily. Three or four deep breaths, in and out, and I’m there, lol. Before writing this, I looked up images for Yoga positions online. There are many of them that don’t entail crossed legs. I’d encourage anyone to try them, but especially someone who writes, or is into Creative endeavors of any kind,

    Elizabeth

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  7. wildchild47 says:

    And I must wonder,
    if the way I sit
    is the reason I see
    the world so differently
    than many others.

    This is so interesting, and as others have noted, an incredible sense of calm and acceptance, infuses this piece.
    I can appreciate how short legs makes for uncomfortable positioning – I too have the same “problem” – but the ability to adapt and then change, and now, clearly, to consider that the “debilitating” in some way, has and is a gift, is truly remarkable, and transcendental. I too have health problems related to my spine and chronic pain is a killer – so to read this piece and feel and see how someone else can overcome and continues to not let it be a hindrance, is inspiring.

    Wildchild, (we must sit down and discuss your choice of names(identity). The story of the Wild Child figures a great deal in the way I see the world around me). And yes, I do see it as a gift. I doubt I would have become a writer, and later, a Writing Instructor, had it not been my reality. Your comment brought that home for me, far more clearly than ever before. Joseph Campbell tells us we must follow our bliss. I found bliss in writing, but my choices were always built on the reality of my physical condition. I knew I could go on writing, even if I ended up in a wheelchair, which still is a possibility that no longer frightens me as it once did. And again, perhaps that half-lotus pose has taught me a bit about acceptance. Thanks for the toughtful comment,

    Elizabeth

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  8. Gillena Cox says:

    “meditative imagery,
    that still awes me,
    like that child”

    i think after reading your poem, where there is awe there is life; happy Wednesday Elizabeth

    much love…

    Gillena, I couldn’t agree with you more. At age four, I had a close call with death. And life has been awesome ever since. Thanks for stopping by,

    Elizabeth

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  9. Khaya Ronkainen says:

    And I must wonder,
    if the way I sit
    is the reason I see
    the world so differently

    Love how these lines can be taken literally and metaphorically. I also admire the gracefulness in your piece, despite the discomfort mentioned. This is truly inspiring, thank you!

    You are more than welcome, Khaya. This poem has been rooting around for some time. I even had several dreams about how to say what I wanted to say. The prompt was just the spark I needed. And it was a bit like taking dictation. Was concerned that it might not be all that poetic, but decided that its honesty was more important. And thank you for reading and commenting,

    Elizabeth

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  10. Susan Chast says:

    Short stature is only a physical thing. Understanding and instinct extend your stature immensely, and poetry does the rest. May you always feel awe. Pain deadened my awe quite a bit until I had lumbar-fusion surgery. Now it’s back. (Pun!) Perhaps with your experience, I might not have needed the operation. (But I have no reason for regret.)

    Thank you, Susan. I was 17, the first time I was hospitalized for back problems. It resulted in a three week stay where I was kept in traction the entire time. Afterward, the doctor had me fitted for a very cumbersome corset-like back brace with metal strips that ran down both sides of my spine, telling me I’d have to wear it for a year. The corset did wonders for my chunky physique, but the pain didn’t diminish. After the year, the doc told me I’d have to wear it for the rest of my life. I went home, took it off, and told my Mother that I’d never put it on again. Amazingly enough, no one argued with me about that decision. Spinal fusion was discussed with my parents, and they were told there was a good possibility that I might be paralyzed by the surgery. My father said they wouldn’t take the chance and that I should be allowed as much of a chance at normalcy as possible. When I saw a specialist, three years ago, I told him that story. He said the possibilities were still the same, but, at my age, I was no longer a good candidate for such surgery. He was also the one who made that comment about the way I sit. I am so glad the fusion worked for you. It didn’t go so well for my sister-in-law. But this entire conversation, simply makes me think, that the yoga pose somehow brought me a level of acceptance that has been more of a reward than anything else.

    Elizabeth

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  11. Oh, Elizabeth, we have so much in common. We escape pain and debilities in our world of words, and, tapping our canes, still find purpose and joy in our lives. I wish we could meet for tea!

    Lol, Beverly, yes a lot of common ground. I don’t drink tea, but you’d be welcome to brew yourself a pot. I’ll stick to my usual cold water. As far as a good long chat goes, emails work well for that. And I’d be pleased as punch to hear from you.

    Elizabeth

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  12. sanaarizvi says:

    And I must wonder,
    if the way I sit
    is the reason I see
    the world so differently

    Definitely!❤️ Yoga helps clear our mind and rejuvenate the body 😀

    Thanks Sanaa. I was particularly pleased to learn that the word Yoga, means union. Actualization only happens when mind, body, and spirit find that necessary union.

    Elizabeth

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  13. Truedessa says:

    I think it is the way you sit, shifting energy

    Like

  14. annell4 says:

    Lovely half-lotus.

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  15. Miss Stacy says:

    beautiful poem about growth in spirit as well as acceptance of ones self. love it.

    Like

  16. Rosemary Nissen-Wade says:

    Fascinating! Both the poem and the following discussion. (And I think it is most certainly ‘poetic enough’! I love the simple, true language.) I have never been able to sit in the lotus position. I could cross my legs all right, but not get those knees down far enough. And altogether my body does not like yoga positions, though I have tried in the past – sometimes for many months at a time. Luckily, I can meditate quite well sitting normally on a straight-backed chair.

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