April PAD Challenge: Day 26

Choices

There are those who, in a surreal
sort of manner, would postulate
that if one should ever come
face to face with self, those two
selves would instantly disappear,
become forever non-existent,
negating past, present, and all
future possibilities.

Yet, self-awareness calls us to dig
deep, find our self, that one from
the past. Bring that self face to face
with the present moment, and begin
the only conversation we might
ever have, concerning any, and all,
future possibilities.

Elizabeth Crawford 4/26/2017

Posting to Poets United: Poetry Pantry #353  5/14/2017
http://poetryblogroll.blogspot.com/

Notes: Image is a photograph taken at a local park. Musical inspiration is Sarah McLachlan, singing Bring on the Wonder.

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About 1sojournal

Loves words and language. Dances on paper to her own inner music. Loves to share and keeps several blogs to facilitate that. They can be found here: http://1sojournal.wordpress.com/ https://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/ http://claudetteellinger.wordpress.com/
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19 Responses to April PAD Challenge: Day 26

  1. Pingback: Heeding Haiku With Chèvrefeuille, April 26th 2017, a whole new challenge … troiku – Ladyleemanila

  2. Jae Rose says:

    The self can often split and separate – I could picture how we must reassemble and become one identity

    Your comment reminds me of the first glimpse I got of the hell bent for leather tom boy I was. Dirty ripped jeans, toothy sneer, and both hands up and fisted. Oh, and she could cuss like a truck driver. We definitely had a lot of work to do. But, eventually she showed me how she could make music and even helped me learn how to dance to it. And I showed her how to get rid of those huge chips on her shoulders.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  3. oldegg says:

    Coming face to face with myself in the mirror every day I wonder whether the old man in the mirror can see the young man I still think I am.

    Perhaps, one of these mornings, you could start that conversation and then stand still and listen? (See my comment to Jae). It is really an enlightening experience.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Gillena Cox says:

    ” Bring that self face to face
    with the present moment, and begin
    the only conversation we might
    ever have, ”

    Luv the image, the poem, the video. Thanks for the completeness in your package of share

    much love…

    And thank you for noticing Gillena. What many don’t understand is that is possible because I chose to do the digging and initiated that incredibly life-enhancing conversation. It was scary, at first, but oh what I learned in the process.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  5. sanaarizvi says:

    There is something about coming face to face with yourself that haunts me in a beautiful way..

    Thank you Sanaa. I believe every soul seeks wholeness, and is haunted by that awareness. That conversation, however, doesn’t happen unless we choose to let it. When we do, we also open the door to undreamed of possibilities.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  6. magicalmysticalteacher says:

    A conversation between past self and present self could have interesting outcomes. Or disturbing ones. Or delightful ones. Why miss the chance?

    Lol, exactly, MMT. I began that conversation just before I turned thirty and it continues to this day. I believe my poems, art work, everything I do is a direct result of finally sitting down alone, breathing deeply, and saying, “Hi, my name is Elizabeth, what’s yours?”

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sherry Marr9 says:

    Integrating the young and older selves is the journey…….for one to become congruent. Your poems always make me think……

    You nailed it my wildwoman friend. If we don’t do that integrating, we are forever pulled in all sorts of opposing directions. That’s stressful and creates innumerable questions, and lots of headaches. Is thinking a good or bad thing? Lol, I can hear that wicked chortle…

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  8. annell4 says:

    Again you have outdone yourself. Yes, making friends with ourselves seems a good thing to do.
    This unknown creature that is “me.” Waiting….to be known. Remove the veil. Show me who you really are. I will show you love. We will come together, we will be one.

    Annell, I hope you know I am sitting here clapping gleefully. Your comment is a delightful little poem. Hope you know you are loved and much appreciated,

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I love the though of having a face to face discussion with myself… wonderful

    Good for you, Bjorn. Many are terrified at the very idea, and for all kinds of reasons. The first one being acceptance, and then understanding. Some of my self-talk is scattered through the poems on this site. While much of it remains on the pages of my journal. My entire life was altered by an accident when I was very young. I spent a lot of time searching, studying, and questioning who and what I might be only to discover that I was looking in the wrong places. It is truly best to go directly to the source, don’t you think? So, I did and have never regretted that decision. Thanks for stopping in,

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Reaching that point of self to self is the point at which we can forgive ourselves for what we might have done better, and understand we did the best we knew how at the time … and enter the part of our life that is truly contentment. I believe Maya Angelou phrased it “If I would of known better, I’d have done better.”

    And you, dear lady, have found the very heart of this discussion. The whole point is to forgive ourselves for being only human, afterall. We spend our early years being told how we’ve done it wrong, and no matter how much we may succeed, we never quite grow out of that flinch away from anything remotely similar to that pointing finger. When we finally reach out and instead, grab that hand, we attain a success that is incomparable to any other. Thank you, Beverly, and I love the Angelou quote,

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Anna :o] says:

    Much wisdom in your words. Self-awareness brings with it the opportunity of peace with who we are, or the ability to change should we need to…
    Anna :o]

    Yes, Anna, that peace must begin within ourselves before we can truly offer it to others. And change doesn’t occur until we see the need for it. And even then it is most often difficult, at best. Thanks for dropping by,

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Myrna Rosa says:

    I like this. I think confronting all of our “selves” is most important to reaching maturity and growing into an integrated person.

    Myrna, I started with the child, who was combative. Then the teen, who was incredibly elusive. The young Mother was far more frightened of me, than I was of her. It got easier after that. Am I integrated? One can only hope, and I do. But then the next question comes along and we all sit down and have a board meeting. Now, that is fun.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  13. ZQ says:

    Your 1st. stanza was an indubitable truth. 🙂

    ZQ, I was referring to what I’ve read in SiFy novels about different dimensions and time travel. But, even as I wrote about it, I realized that if the past and present did meet and have that conversation, they would both be forever changed and the future would be far different than it would be otherwise. My own experience confirms that to me. I don’t even want to contemplate where, or if, I’d be in the place I am now were it not true. So, thank you for your comment and I’ll continue giving thanks to a Universe that guided me to that reality.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  14. C.C. says:

    This reminds me of the Socratic idea that the unexamined life is not worth living….if we are to truly know ourselves, then it takes examination of who we are….the many selves that we bring to the table of our Lives. Sometimes it’s a dirty table 😛

    Yes, c.c., it can be an incredibly dirty table. That just means it has to be cleaned up. We can only be benefited by giving ourselves a cleared playing field. It’s called healing. And quite often, healing is a painful experience, especially at the beginning. It hurts to move broken parts, but if they are to heal correctly they need therapy that helps that process to take place. Although I am familiar with the quote that you refer to, there was another that guided me. And that is that one must write about what one knows. Which is why my writing has always been of the personal kind. My story is the one I know. It is my ongoing conversation with me. Thanks for reading and commenting,

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Yet, self-awareness calls us to dig
    deep, find our self, that one from
    the past.

    Despite being aware, one still seeks the assurance of wanting to be comfortable with one’s desires and curiosities. Very true Elizabeth, human nature perhaps!

    Hank

    I agree Hank, we do want that assurance. However, we most often seek it from others who are more knowledgeable,
    more experienced than we think we are. In accepting their assurances, we are accepting their definitions, not just of the world at large, but of us as well. When I started writing, I realized that I now had the power to create my own definitions. Mind blowing information. And also very scary. But, I loved writing, and eventually found that I preferred my own definitions. As Rilke told that young aspiring poet, don’t look outside yourself, don’t ask others, ask yourself. That was the best information I had ever heard.

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Rosemary Nissen-Wade says:

    To me, a wonderful, exciting prospect (when first put to me by a psychiatrist in my early twenties; I was eager to be integrated as promised).

    Thanks Rosemary. Yes, it sounds so very simple, doesn’t it? Hearing about it is one thing, doing it is something entirely different. I’m curious. Was it as simple as you first thought it would be? How long did it take? And did you stay with the process?

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Amalia Abbar says:

    I wonder why facing our own self is such a scary prospect! This is such a relatable write, thank you for sharing :))

    Welcome to Soul’s Music, Amalia. I can think of one very simple reason. What happens if you find you really don’t like the person you are? What do you do then? Are you stuck forever? Change is never an easy process. It takes concentrated hard work, struggle, and commitment. Accepting and loving yourself is something that entails a life-long willingness to do. It doesn’t just happen once and then is done. We are constantly growing and changing. There are many, I imagine, who would simply say, “I’ve got more pressing things to do, like get a job, pay my bills, take care of others….”

    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Rosemary Nissen-Wade says:

    I stayed with my psychotherapy for six years. (In another way, once started it never really stops. I’m glad I had a very good – Jungian – therapist to internalize.) The integration didn’t take anywhere near as long as six years; I had other issues to deal with too, so the whole experience took that time. Could have gone longer, had I chosen, but ceased by mutual consent. No-one promised me any of it would be simple or easy, nor did I imagine so. And it wasn’t. It was bloody hard work, and oftentimes exceedingly confronting. But I did find the integrative aspects as exciting as I expected – dramatic, in fact, if not always pleasant. I’m forever grateful for those six years; without them I might well have destroyed myself long ago.

    Thank you, thank you, Rosemary. For your clear and honest response to my questions. I was so hoping you would do so. I didn’t see a counselor until after I unwittingly started the process and had gotten comfortable with it. When I finally did seek someone out, they told me I was the easiest person they had to deal with because I’d already done a great deal of the work, and it was nice to just be a listener, lol. I’m glad you had a Jungian as well. They encourage talk of dreams, mythology, and symbolism and realize the importance of all of them. Hats off to you for sticking to it and yes, I whole-heartedly agree, the work always continues.

    Elizabeth
    PS I just want you to know that you, here, are an answer to a prayer(about a very different matter), spoken only ten minutes ago. Thanks for that as well.

    Liked by 1 person

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