Inside The Wall

For The Sunday Whirl: wordle #78
http://sundaywhirl.wordpress.com/

Inside The Wall

Beneath deeper shadows
of umbrella defined
as childhood experiences,
a light shifts as thunder
of constant accusation
joins inherited excuses,
to become avowed partners
in mutual stand against
further confrontation.

Elizabeth Crawford  10/14/12

Notes: For me, these words didn’t have a very poetic sound to them, but they did bring a very distinctive image to mind. One of that individual who constantly spouts judgments and points a finger at others, to distract focus from his own doings.

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About 1sojournal

Loves words and language. Dances on paper to her own inner music. Loves to share and keeps several blogs to facilitate that. They can be found here: http://1sojournal.wordpress.com/ https://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/ http://claudetteellinger.wordpress.com/
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23 Responses to Inside The Wall

  1. Irene says:

    A very serendipitous arrangement of the words Elizabeth. When I read the poem source, all became so spiritual and powerful.

    The relationship between parent and what the child becomes is the strongest one most of us ever experience. I don’t read the source poem until after I write, afraid of being influenced. But, this one was a pleasure to read after the writing. No matter how we are influenced by another person’s words, there is a spiritual bond created by that connection. Thanks for dropping by and for making me think, as usual.

    Elizabeth

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  2. vivinfrance says:

    Oh so right, and beautifully put.

    Thank you much Viv, your words make me feel warm and satisfied.

    Elizabeth

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  3. drpkp says:

    Wow! Powerfully poetically put! Find it interesting that for you as well as me – the words conjured a sense of moral outrage (perhaps the single words “inherited” and “excuse” captured us. I really enjoyed the positive sense of bearing witness. Beautifully done!

    Pearl, thank you. Most of the time, when I get the list of words, I find two that seem to grab each other and refuse to let go. That’s what happened with the words “inherited excuses”. That in turn, set off a trigger to several distinct images and I was gone, on my way to the poem. Good to know that others experience the same or similar things. The process of creation is such an insular one, that we often forget how very common some of it can be.

    Elizabeth

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  4. Mary says:

    Your words definitely conveyed your childhood memory well. I have known that kind of person myself….the one who always distracts from the main issue, the one who always points the finger.

    Mary, as you probably already know, I grew up with most of the fingers pointed directly at me. It was difficult but also eventually turned toward freedom because I knew I didn’t want to be the same. Had to reach beyond that knee jerk reaction and create my own path. It still remains a struggle at times,

    Elizabeth

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  5. Ah… the one who always looks for scapegoats. This is so clearly and concisely framed it makes it all the more powerful in its poetry.

    I was, still am, the family scapegoat. Thank you for your comment. I was worried that it was anything but poetic, but have a tendency to follow the words where they want to go. My one major attempt to block the inner control freak, and for the most part, it does work.

    Elizabeth

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  6. I love this:

    “Beneath deeper shadows
    of umbrella defined”

    Really glad you like it. It was my first indication that this piece might not lend itself to my need of music in my poetry. I learn so much from these wordles,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  7. Laurie Kolp says:

    Constant accusation stands out to me… such power in breaking free from that.

    Thanks Laurie, not sure we ever completely break away, but must keep struggling to remember and then breathe deeply,

    Elizabeth

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  8. There’s so much power and potential for future healthy relationships in the connectivity of these first relationships in life. Your writing is potent, Elizabeth!

    By the way…I tool your suggestion and watched Finding Forrester…I LOVED it, thank you!

    Hannah, thanks for the potent, lol. I had forgotten how much I loved that movie when I first saw it. Am now waiting for “Dead Poets Society” another favorite. Netflix has informed me that they created a new genre based on my choices. “Intellectual Drama.” Not bad for a North Wisconsin Hillbilly, yes?

    Elizabeth

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  9. anl4 says:

    I like what you did, even though you didn’t think the words had a poetic sound.

    Secret, Annell? I am aware that my interest in psychology creeps into my poetry, but this one wasn’t creeping, it was running straight at me screaming and waving it’s hands. I really do like the music that internal rhyme creates. This one however, seemed to put the pedal to the metal and wasn’t going to wait for me. Sort of fun when that happens, scary but fun.

    Elizabeth

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  10. brenda w says:

    Your use of language is strong and intelligent. That is poetic in itself. I’ve read this one several times, and will read it again. Thank you, Elizabeth.

    Ahh Brenda, thank you for that. I was afraid it wouldn’t be understandable. I know in my heart that poetry is whatever we choose to make it. But, this one came so clear, so strong, and so fast, it was difficult to just trust it. Glad that I finally did,

    Elizabeth

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  11. Mama Pajama says:

    powerful…I kind of used the words in the same way, that’s just how they felt to me. thanks for sharing ~

    I have a secret inner creek that always wants a happy or positive ending. That’s not an honest or realistic view of life, but still have to fight with it at times. Your poem was far more positive than this one is. But, I know from experience that this one is both true and honest. Thanks for stopping in,

    Elizabeth

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  12. JulesPaige says:

    Your verse reminded me of a comment posted in our local papers editorial section. A gent pointing fingers where there was no need – just to stir up the pot. Several answered him with questions – Like, really, why did you bother? All you had to do was go your own way and leave the rest of us in peace.

    Sometimes the words do flow easier than others. I wasn’t sure at first where this list was going. Sometimes it just takes one word to jump out and say where it belongs and then the rest …
    Well it is something I enjoy writing and do hope others enjoy the read. 🙂

    Jules, I think many are enjoying your installments. The ‘crazymakers’ will always be among us, and they do so love to stir the pot and just step back and watch to see what happens. About the words, yes sometimes they flow with ease, more often however, I have to do some tweaking and twisting. This one definately came more easily than most.

    Elizabeth

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  13. magicalmysticalteacher says:

    How brave—and how writerly—to go ahead and use words that seem unpoetic, just because they are there and need to be dealt with. Sometimes writing, no matter what, is the most important thing. And you wrote.

    Whirling with Robinson Jeffers

    Thank you much MMT, that’s what I used to tell my students, better to write than not, better to break the silence than to be silenced. Much of what I taught now comes back when I feel inclined not to do the writing. I’m glad that it does.

    Elizabeth

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  14. PJF Sayers says:

    Elizabeth, our childhood experiences do indeed shape who we become. I like the direction you went with the words in this poem.

    Pamela
    *No, I don’t have a poem this week, but I am visiting other poets.

    Thank you for visiting me, Pamela. And you are correct, our childhood response in order to cope is strong, but it can also be changed, if we choose to do so. I will miss your flow of vivid imagery this week,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  15. pmwanken says:

    I think my favorite part of this piece is the title…well wordled!!

    Glad you enjoyed Paula,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  16. Stan Ski says:

    Succinct… You nailed it!

    Thanks much Stan, so good to see you back,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  17. Lilu says:

    Short yet powerful. Parent-child relationship, I think its effect is widely underrated. A very well wordled piece of nature vs. nurture here. I sense a psychologic undertone. Me likey. And for the record, this didn’t seem at all as though the words were not of your liking. Skillfully poetic and intelligent at the same time =) Got me deep in thought. Thanks for the read!

    Thank you for your very generous words Lilu. I tried to return your visit, but something was wrong and I couldn’t leave a comment. I think the very heart of your poem was in those last six lines.

    Elizabeth

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  18. Mama Zen says:

    What a powerful piece! Really well done.

    Mama Zen, thank you for such generous words. When they come as quickly as this one did, I find them difficult to trust. Maybe I should rethink that?

    Elizabeth

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  19. ms pie says:

    love yr response to the wordle…. inside stuff peeking through… ms pie

    ms pie, I think there is always inside stuff peeking through in most writing. This one however, was very deliberate. Thanks so much for visiting and commenting,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  20. Green Speck says:

    I loved the way you played with the words … good one !!!

    Welcome and thanks for taking the time to read and comment. I really like playing with words,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  21. teri says:

    We move beyond our childhood, but the reference point is still there. Like a rock that has become place to stand to see the world. Most days it is under my feet and not weighing me down. I so enjoy your writing and your comments. xo teri

    Teri, your comment reminds me of a long ago moment, when with the aid of spontaneous imagery, I found myself standing in front of a huge boulder. It was in my imagination, so I climbed it and sat to rest at its top, only to find myself looking out upon my own inner realms. Thank you for reminding me that there are still days when I can relax there and feel like I can see a bit of forever.

    Elizabeth

    Like

  22. Marianne says:

    Sorry you didn’t think the words had a poetic sound to them, but you did a fine job of weaving them together in a very concise and compact fashion!

    Marianne, I usually struggle with the words every week. It is seldom that they fall into place, as they did this week, after simply presenting me with an image. But, I’ll take the windfall when it comes and just grin happily. Thanks for visiting,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  23. We are always our own harshest critic – your poem was excellent! “inherited excuses” make it so easy to blame someone else!

    Like

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