Only An Attempted Wordle Murder

For The Sunday Whirl: Wordle #70
http://sundaywhirl.wordpress.com/

Only An Attempted Wordle Murder

Won’t you celebrate with me
these words I am tipping,
affixing onto this page?

What I have shaped
from only hinted at, tinted
experiences in prelude of childhood.

I had no model
for vivid verse, only thinning tinny
sound of fast fading, long ago memory.

I made it up
as fingers of mind drifted over shadowed,
bloodied nicks in woodwork of time.

Here on this bridge
between then and now, past waves
restlessly attempt to gentle, defuse my determination, but

Everyday something has tried to kill me:
insidious need to silence, to cut off
limbs of speech,

has constantly attempted to split, to cleave me
completely from these words,

and has failed.

Elizabeth Crawford
8/18/12

Process Notes: Words in italics are from Lucille Clifton’s poem won’t you celebrate with me. I struggle with these wordles every week. Fight them, punch them, get punched by them, most often coming to a point of frustration that has me mumbling incoherently. This week was no different. Tried several things and nothing was working. Then remembered the wonderful Haiku that MagicalMysticalTeacher has done using other poet’s lines for a starting point. Her work may be found here http://magicalmysticalteacher.wordpress.com/

Realized I might try something similar (not Haiku, of course) with my favorite poet, Lucille Clifton. Found my favorite of her poems  http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/won-t-you-celebrate-with-me/  
and the words began to fall into place. I am beginning to think that the only reason I continue to try to do these wordles is because I am a bit whacko and because I feel so very satisfied when the torture ends with something on paper. That does not mean I am not tempted to add a warning to each of them:

DISCRETION ADVISED: Could create a tendency toward violence aimed at words, paper and pen, keyboards, and monitors. But, as with all risk-taking adventures, may also encourage a feeling of bliss not to be found elsewhere.

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About 1sojournal

Loves words and language. Dances on paper to her own inner music. Loves to share and keeps several blogs to facilitate that. They can be found here: http://1sojournal.wordpress.com/ https://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/ http://claudetteellinger.wordpress.com/
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17 Responses to Only An Attempted Wordle Murder

  1. vivinfrance says:

    I caught the echoes of Magical Mystical Teacher’s haiku as I was reading, and thought I’d clicked on the wrong linky. This can’t be Elizabeth. can it? 🙂 And how clever to do a cento wordle!!!!
    You put that wordling wildness so accurately and poetically! Mine is similarly manic.

    I just had an awful thought Viv. These wordles do seem to get our blood up every week. What if one day we must pay homage to them for saving our lives, or at least preserving them past some allotted time? I can see it now: we finally do meet for that glass of wine and someone takes a photo of the two old biddies with hair frazzled as though from electro-shock treatment and both of us mumbling something about “it’s all Brenda’s fault.”

    Elizabeth

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  2. These are my favorites:

    “What I have shaped
    from only hinted at, tinted
    experiences in prelude of childhood.”

    “Everyday something has tried to kill me”

    “has constantly attempted to split, to cleave me
    completely from these words,
    and has failed.”

    Flipside, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to write all of that out here, but those lines don’t work without Clifton’s words and I can’t take credit for them. So I’ll say thank you from both of us. Lucille’s name means “light” and she will always be that for me,

    Elizabeth

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  3. And didn’t it all come out with great success! Well done! I could feel your frustration and yet also your triumph at the end…LOL Fabulous!

    Thank you Daydreamer, because the triumph at the end is always stronger than the frustration. But, more important, thank you for the poem you wrote to these words. Know that its message was received.

    Elizabeth

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  4. barbara_ says:

    Nifty idea. I’ve been admiring her way of handling the wordle, too. You’ve put your stamp on this, though, with the sound play.
    Wonder if there is a name for this borrow-and-add form. Cento is patchwork, but this is also weaving and embroidery.

    Thanks so much Barbara. I used to do something similar in college, using it as a mnemonic devise to remember who wrote what. I met Lucille once and told her that I had written poetic responses to her poetry (you can find one of them, here on this site under the category “Counter-Point Harmony”). She told me to send them to her. I was far too insecure to act on that. Something I will always regret. However, this poem of hers has always been a signal fire to me, underlining the reality that each day we have a choice to engage in life or simply give up. There are always those days when we need a hand up, she will always be that for me.

    Elizabeth

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  5. drpkp says:

    This is a terrific use of the wordle words and any frustration expressed is simply known as ‘back story’ provided – the words here flow – in this unique point/counterpoint dance. Lovely 🙂

    Thank you PKP. The frustration expressed is simply rebellion against a chosen discipline and the reality that things don’t always go the way of smoothness. Very glad you enjoyed and all of it is a dance to a long ago chosen music,

    Elizabeth

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  6. Mary says:

    Enjoyed this! Yes, those Wordle Words try to kill me too. I love how you worked in the words from Clifton’s poem. Definitely proved to be a good way of getting those Wordle Words in line!!

    Amazing how even imagining standing next to her as she spoke made this simple and easy after all that other frustration,

    Elizabeth

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  7. JulesPaige says:

    I really enjoyed this. Some days it is easier and other days one wonders where the muse has gone of sulking to. While it only seems that I am never at a loss for words, some days do shine brighter than others. And I too get frustrated when the pen runs out of ink, or I hit the wrong computer key and delete a well worked piece. While this is similar to MMT and sort of a Cento, I think you have the honor of naming a new form my dear. 🙂 Something I’ll try to remember when the blank page looms and I’m out on a limb.

    I’m here:
    http://julesgemsandstuff.blogspot.com/2012/08/sw-70-feathers-flights-and-foundlings.html

    A new form? I doubt it, probably closer to someone’s idea of plagerism. Lucille Clifton gives me hope, words, ideas, and a sense of just how lucky I am. Thanks Jules,

    Elizabeth

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  8. Marianne says:

    Great use of the words, Elizabeth! I loved: “fingers of mind drifted over shadowed, bloodied nicks in woodwork of time.” And I enjoyed your description of the wordle words: “Fight them, punch them, get punched by them, most often coming to a point of frustration that has me mumbling incoherently.” That really made me smile. I struggle with them, too, but I eventually embrace them and return each week for more! And thanks for sharing Lucille Clifton’s poem!

    Marianne, thank you. You chose my favorite line in all of this. And I know I am not alone in this love/hate relationship with the wordles. That is probably another reason for continuing: knowing I am not the only one.

    Elizabeth

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  9. brenda w says:

    You’ve done the words proud, Elizabeth! It is great that our community of writers inspired you. My heart feels good this morning, and I thank you for your work. Also, thank you for reminding me of Clifton’s work.

    Thank you Brenda for choosing the words. My angst is never aimed at you personally and I would hope you know that. I keep coming back because the words always make me think, and thus make me work. That always feels good. And I love this community because it gives me something I do not find in an other aspect of my life. It brings me to life, just as it was intended to do.

    Elizabeth

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  10. margo roby says:

    ‘I am beginning to think that the only reason I continue to try to do these wordles is because I am a bit whacko and because I feel so very satisfied when the torture ends with something on paper. That does not mean I am not tempted to add a warning to each of them:

    DISCRETION ADVISED: Could create a tendency toward violence aimed at words, paper and pen, keyboards, and monitors. But, as with all risk-taking adventures, may also encourage a feeling of bliss not to be found elsewhere.’
    Then, we are all whacko, Elizabeth, but that success is so very, very sweet.
    I like any cento-like form, but realised on rereading that, except for the first line, you can remove all of the Clifton lines and the poem works still, maybe even smoother.

    My problem [three weeks bare cupboard] must be that I haven’t reached the violent stage. That usually is the signal that something is coming through. Maybe next week. Meanwhile, keep murdering them.

    margo

    Thank you Margo but these words wouldn’t have been written without Lucille’s to focus them, or without MagicalMysticalTeacher’s model to remind me. Most days I write alone, but there are some days that I must lean on my friends to get me there. There are so many things I could say about your ‘bare cupboards’ but I’m sure you yourself have already said or thought them. Having only recently come back from a rather lengthy bare cupboard of my own I can only suggest that no one can tell your particular story except you and we need your part of ‘our’ story.

    Elizabeth

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  11. PJF Sayers says:

    Elizabeth, what a marvelous idea. As Barb said this does have your own sound, which is all Elizabeth. I couldn’t agree with you more on the wordles, they do push us above and beyond. This week is probably the first time in a few weeks I fairly happy with what I wrote, not to say that there isn’t always room for improvement with my writing.

    Pamela
    p.s. I haven’t forgotten about the music prompt, I am still tinkering with that one. 🙂

    Pamela, as I said it doesn’t matter, your poems are worth the wait. I like the fact that you take how ever much time you need. I need to remember that when I grow impatient. And I’m glad that you hear my inner music while sharing your own inner vision,

    Elizabeth

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  12. Brenda says:

    Very intricate, mixing with Lucille’s words, and wonderous. I am unfamiliar with Clifton’s work and will look her up when time permits. All best. – Brenda Bishop Blakey

    The first time I saw her read, she made me laugh out loud and I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up. Hope you look her up and enjoy the read. I’d be interested in hearing what you think,

    Elizabeth

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  13. Willow says:

    Brava, you ended with perseverance, you have survived. Great job. I like Lucille Clifton too.

    Thank you Willow, there’s a great deal to admire about the woman and her work. And yes I did survive and am very grateful for that fact,

    Elizabeth

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  14. Mama Zen says:

    I love the way you did this!

    And I love what you do, as well. Mutual admiration is easy in this community,

    Elizabeth

    Like

  15. You’ve paid the late Lucille Clifton great homage. I find her work fascinating as well. Her ties to Buffalo, NY endeared her to my field of vision. Her words secured my eyes. As do yours of late. I love this piece, Elizabeth.

    Walt, Lucille’s name means ‘Light’ and whenever I saw her read, whether on film or in person, her eyes lit up and radiated her inner joy at doing what she was doing. I felt I had stumbled into that light, but knew immediately that I wanted to remain within its sphere. Some days the light is dim, even a bit burned out, but I keep reaching for it none the less. Thank you for your generous words,

    Elizabeth

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  16. seingraham says:

    Well done Elizabeth – great homage to Lucille Clifton by weaving your wonderfully wordled words around her lines … I’m sure she’d get a kick out of the whole idea and the outcome.

    http://thepoet-tree-house.blogspot.ca/2012/08/grey-matters.html

    That is definitely my hope as well,

    Elizabeth

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  17. Cathy says:

    Love it simple love. I don’t threaten the papers and other stuff. No I use my Muse as punching bag.

    Lol, Cathy. I can’t afford to get angry at my Muse, she might stop speaking to me.

    Elizabeth

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